Gianluca Mittone

Ph.D. student at Computer Science Department, University of Turin
Parallel Computing group
Via Pessinetto 12, 10149 Torino – Italy 
Email: gianluca.mittone@unito.it

Short Bio

Gianluca Mittone received his Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science in 2017 with a thesis on the handling of exceptions in Description Logics, proposing the implementation of an algorithm for the automatic revision of ontologies exploiting a Typicality operator. He also received the Master’s Degree in Computer Science in 2019 with a master thesis on a novel distributed approach for deep learning, named NNT (Nearest Neighbours Training), which takes advantage of a locally synchronous approach to achieve a better trade-off between computational time and learning results.

After eight months as a research engineer at the Computer Science Department of the University of Turin, he is now a Ph.D. student in Modeling and Data Science at the same university, working on different projects involving HPC and Machine Learning techniques.

Fields of interest:

  • High Performance Computing
  • Deep learning
  • Machine Learning

Publications

2021

  • F. D’Ascenzo, O. De Filippo, G. Gallone, G. Mittone, M. A. Deriu, M. Iannaccone, A. Ariza-SolĂ©, C. Liebetrau, S. Manzano-Fernández, G. Quadri, T. Kinnaird, G. Campo, J. P. Simao Henriques, J. M. Hughes, A. Dominguez-Rodriguez, M. Aldinucci, U. Morbiducci, G. Patti, S. Raposeiras-Roubin, E. Abu-Assi, and G. M. De Ferrari, “Machine learning-based prediction of adverse events following an acute coronary syndrome (PRAISE): a modelling study of pooled datasets,” The lancet, vol. 397, iss. 10270, pp. 199-207, 2021. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32519-8
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Background The accuracy of current prediction tools for ischaemic and bleeding events after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains insufficient for individualised patient management strategies. We developed a machine learning-based risk stratification model to predict all-cause death, recurrent acute myocardial infarction, and major bleeding after ACS. Methods Different machine learning models for the prediction of 1-year post-discharge all-cause death, myocardial infarction, and major bleeding (defined as Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 3 or 5) were trained on a cohort of 19826 adult patients with ACS (split into a training cohort [80%] and internal validation cohort [20%]) from the BleeMACS and RENAMI registries, which included patients across several continents. 25 clinical features routinely assessed at discharge were used to inform the models. The best-performing model for each study outcome (the PRAISE score) was tested in an external validation cohort of 3444 patients with ACS pooled from a randomised controlled trial and three prospective registries. Model performance was assessed according to a range of learning metrics including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Findings The PRAISE score showed an AUC of 0.82 (95% CI 0.78-0.85) in the internal validation cohort and 0.92 (0.90-0.93) in the external validation cohort for 1-year all-cause death; an AUC of 0.74 (0.70-0.78) in the internal validation cohort and 0.81 (0.76-0.85) in the external validation cohort for 1-year myocardial infarction; and an AUC of 0.70 (0.66-0.75) in the internal validation cohort and 0.86 (0.82-0.89) in the external validation cohort for 1-year major bleeding. Interpretation A machine learning-based approach for the identification of predictors of events after an ACS is feasible and effective. The PRAISE score showed accurate discriminative capabilities for the prediction of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, and major bleeding, and might be useful to guide clinical decision making.

    @article{21:lancet,
    abstract = {Background The accuracy of current prediction tools for ischaemic and bleeding events after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains insufficient for individualised patient management strategies. We developed a machine learning-based risk stratification model to predict all-cause death, recurrent acute myocardial infarction, and major bleeding after ACS.
    Methods Different machine learning models for the prediction of 1-year post-discharge all-cause death, myocardial infarction, and major bleeding (defined as Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 3 or 5) were trained on a cohort of 19826 adult patients with ACS (split into a training cohort [80%] and internal validation cohort [20%]) from the BleeMACS and RENAMI registries, which included patients across several continents. 25 clinical features routinely assessed at discharge were used to inform the models. The best-performing model for each study outcome (the PRAISE score) was tested in an external validation cohort of 3444 patients with ACS pooled from a randomised controlled trial and three prospective registries. Model performance was assessed according to a range of learning metrics including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).
    Findings The PRAISE score showed an AUC of 0.82 (95% CI 0.78-0.85) in the internal validation cohort and 0.92 (0.90-0.93) in the external validation cohort for 1-year all-cause death; an AUC of 0.74 (0.70-0.78) in the internal validation cohort and 0.81 (0.76-0.85) in the external validation cohort for 1-year myocardial infarction; and an AUC of 0.70 (0.66-0.75) in the internal validation cohort and 0.86 (0.82-0.89) in the external validation cohort for 1-year major bleeding.
    Interpretation A machine learning-based approach for the identification of predictors of events after an ACS is feasible and effective. The PRAISE score showed accurate discriminative capabilities for the prediction of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, and major bleeding, and might be useful to guide clinical decision making.},
    annote = {and Francesco Piroli and Andrea Saglietto and Federico Conrotto and Pierluigi Omed{\~A}{\copyright} and Antonio Montefusco and Mauro Pennone and Francesco Bruno and Pier Paolo Bocchino and Giacomo Boccuzzi and Enrico Cerrato and Ferdinando Varbella and Michela Sperti and Stephen B. Wilton and Lazar Velicki and Ioanna Xanthopoulou and Angel Cequier and Andres Iniguez-Romo and Isabel {Munoz Pousa} and Maria {Cespon Fernandez} and Berenice {Caneiro Queija} and Rafael Cobas-Paz and Angel Lopez-Cuenca and Alberto Garay and Pedro Flores Blanco and Andrea Rognoni and Giuseppe {Biondi Zoccai} and Simone Biscaglia and Ivan Nunez-Gil and Toshiharu Fujii and Alessandro Durante and Xiantao Song and Tetsuma Kawaji and Dimitrios Alexopoulos and Zenon Huczek and Jose Ramon {Gonzalez Juanatey} and Shao-Ping Nie and Masa-aki Kawashiri and Iacopo Colonnelli and Barbara Cantalupo and Roberto Esposito and Sergio Leonardi and Walter {Grosso Marra} and Alaide Chieffo and Umberto Michelucci and Dario Piga and Marta Malavolta and Sebastiano Gili and Marco Mennuni and Claudio Montalto and Luigi {Oltrona Visconti} and Yasir Arfat},
    author = {Fabrizio D'Ascenzo and Ovidio {De Filippo} and Guglielmo Gallone and Gianluca Mittone and Marco Agostino Deriu and Mario Iannaccone and Albert Ariza-Sol\'e and Christoph Liebetrau and Sergio Manzano-Fern\'andez and Giorgio Quadri and Tim Kinnaird and Gianluca Campo and Jose Paulo {Simao Henriques} and James M Hughes and Alberto Dominguez-Rodriguez and Marco Aldinucci and Umberto Morbiducci and Giuseppe Patti and Sergio Raposeiras-Roubin and Emad Abu-Assi and Gaetano Maria {De Ferrari}},
    date-modified = {2021-03-26 23:53:19 +0100},
    doi = {10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32519-8},
    issn = {0140-6736},
    journal = {The Lancet},
    number = {10270},
    pages = {199-207},
    title = {Machine learning-based prediction of adverse events following an acute coronary syndrome {(PRAISE)}: a modelling study of pooled datasets},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/James_Hughes3/publication/348501148_Machine_learning-based_prediction_of_adverse_events_following_an_acute_coronary_syndrome_PRAISE_a_modelling_study_of_pooled_datasets/links/6002a81ba6fdccdcb858b6c2/Machine-learning-based-prediction-of-adverse-events-following-an-acute-coronary-syndrome-PRAISE-a-modelling-study-of-pooled-datasets.pdf},
    volume = {397},
    year = {2021},
    bdsk-url-1 = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/James_Hughes3/publication/348501148_Machine_learning-based_prediction_of_adverse_events_following_an_acute_coronary_syndrome_PRAISE_a_modelling_study_of_pooled_datasets/links/6002a81ba6fdccdcb858b6c2/Machine-learning-based-prediction-of-adverse-events-following-an-acute-coronary-syndrome-PRAISE-a-modelling-study-of-pooled-datasets.pdf},
    bdsk-url-2 = {https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32519-8}
    }